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Miami's Magic Makes it a Destination for Business and Life 🏙

Miami becomes the only city to host the Super Bowl a record 11 times times but it's been nearly a decade since it last hosted the big game when the New Orleans Saints defeated the Indianapolis Colts in 2010 — back when Saints fans still celebrated the Super Bowl.

"If you haven't been to Miami in about 10 years, it's a completely different city," said Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez. "It's one of the most beautiful cities in the nation. It's one of the most unique cities in the nation. We're a truly international city. We speak your language. We have a very unique set of tastes and sounds and culture."

Watch the Super Bowl LIV video featuring Miami's own Pitbull:

The city's rich culture and diversity is owed to the fact that 60 percent of the people who live in Miami weren't born here.

"We also know how to throw a great party," assured Gimenez in accepting the ceremonial gold football in Atlanta.

Monday marked the start of a yearlong campaign to highlight South Florida and all it has to offer by creating excitement and building a sense of pride within the community. The Super Bowl video seeks to reintroduce America to everything new since the city last hosted the game.

"Our campaign is an invitation for the world to join Miami and live it," declared Miami Super Bowl Host Committee Chair Rodney Barreto. "We couldn't be more excited to have someone like Pitbull bring this to life – he truly embodies Miami lifestyle and vibe, and its people."

Hard Rock stadium is bathed in the colors of Super Bowl LIV. Photo courtesy Miami Dolphins.

Hard Rock stadium is bathed in the colors of Super Bowl LIV. Photo courtesy Miami Dolphins.

The iconic 47-story Miami Tower, which houses the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee in the heart of downtown Miami, has been bathed in the campaign colors at night as has been Hard Rock Stadium – Miami pink and a Florida-inspired ocean blue.

"We are excited to kick off our year and work with sponsors to 'Live it Miami,'" added Barreto.

In addition to Gimenez and Barreto, NFL Hall of Famer Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins and Hard Rock Stadium Owner Stephen Ross and Vice Chair, President and CEO Tom Garfinkel were also on hand Monday along with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and the Atlanta Super Bowl Host Committee for the handoff of the Super Bowl LIV game ball.

While Super Bowls are already larger than life events, Super Bowl LIV will mark the culmination of the 100th season anniversary of the NFL.

It will spawn special events and activities throughout Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties as part of the festivities. For more information, visit www.MIASBLIV.com.

The Miami Super Bowl Host Committee is planning "significant community programs" around the 2020 game.

"Local minority-owned, women, LGBT and disabled veteran-owned businesses have the opportunity to pursue contracts through the NFL's supplier diversity program, Business Connect," according to committee officials. "The community also has the chance to participate as part of the 10,000 volunteers that will serve as city ambassadors during Super Bowl week."

To learn more about how to get involved, visit www.MIASBLIV.com

"We're at the bottom of the map, but we're always on top," Pitbull raps in the video. "Host of Super Bowl 54 making history. Eleven Super Bowls. We produced the most NFL players and that's no mystery."

Bal Harbour Village to Ban Single-Use Plastics Beginning in October 🍃 #Glocal

There's really no valid argument against the idea that single-use plastics are ruining the planet. About 40 percent of plastic products are used only once, and as a result, almost 700 species have been harmed by this trash, according to National Geographic. The European Union recently banned ten types of single-use plastic items, including polystyrene cups, citing reports that 80 percent of marine litter is made of the stuff.

In South Florida, Bal Harbour will take a similar approach. Last week, the village council voted unanimously to ban most single-use plastics, including straws, utensils, and shopping bags.

Environmentalists say single-use plastics pollute the oceans, causing damage to ecosystems.  Photo by  Bo Eide / Flickr

Environmentalists say single-use plastics pollute the oceans, causing damage to ecosystems.

Photo by Bo Eide / Flickr

"This is something that I don’t think anyone’s doing across the state... so we’re feeling our way through and seeing what the reaction is and how it works," Mayor Gabe Groisman said at the April 16 council meeting where the vote took place. "We actually don’t know how it’s gonna fly, but we think it’s the right kind of statement to make."

The ordinance prohibits the use, sale, or distribution of single-use plastics in commercial establishments, including restaurants, hotels, retail stores, and condo and apartment buildings. Officials in Bal Harbour, a ritzy, oceanfront community best known for its luxury shopping mall, say they crafted the regulations to address plastic pollution in public areas.

"Bal Harbour Village is a major and internationally recognized tourist destination that continues to encounter discarded plastic items on the Village’s beaches, waterways, and streets, as a result of the improper disposal of these single-use plastic items," a council memo states.

The ban comes as the Florida Legislature debates bills that would preempt municipalities such as Bal Harbour from prohibiting plastics. Councilman Buzzy Sklar says he recently visited Tallahassee to talk to lawmakers, who suggested it was "very favorable that [Bal Harbour's] ordinance will stand up." The village's attorney has also crafted the ordinance in such a way that it can be amended to abide by state law.

As currently written, the warning period for the ban begins October 1. On December 1, businesses that flout the rules will be fined $250 per infraction. Individuals can be fined $25 per infraction.

In addition to applying to commercial establishments, the ordinance also pertains to all Bal Harbour-owned facilities and village-approved events. A person who books a pavilion at a village park for a birthday party, for example, could be fined for using plastic utensils, but a person on a spontaneous picnic would not.

The law makes exceptions for medical and dental offices, as well as for schools.